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Driving tips and other life stuff

Driving in snow

I can tell you not to drive in snow until I'm blue in the face - and not just from the cold. The unfortunate fact is, most of us have to get to work or classes by hook or by crook, and staying snuggly indoors every time there's a white-out isn't an option.

How to handle the snow:

  1. Put your sensible head on

    Keep an eye on the weather forecast and check if there are any severe weather warnings before you decide to drive.

    If you're being advised not to use the roads, maybe check in with your boss. Depending on the roads you take, it may be actually dangerous for you to be driving.

  2. Prepare your car

    If driving's on despite the snow, you need to leave some time for getting your car ready. Although there's no specific offence concerning snow on your car, you could be done for driving without due care and attention if you got in a crash.

    Things you need to check:

    • You've cleared snow from the roof - if you don't, it'll start melting and slipping down your windscreen as you drive, which is obviously dangerous
    • There's no snow on the bonnet because this can blow UP onto your windscreen
    • Any air instakes are clear - if they're blocked, it'll stop your heating working properly (brrr)
    • Your number plate and lights are cleared of snow and can be seen properly
  3. Go read our post about everything you need to know before winter gets bad.
  4. Check your journey

    People go a bit funny in the snow. It's like the adult part of them vacates for the day, leaving a silly kid behind. Traffic will be poor in busy areas, there'll be drivers doing bizarre things - generally, your route into work probably won't be as smooth as it usually is.

    Before you leave, check your local radio or TV channel to get an idea of how things are out there. When it snows in the UK, there's more media coverage than for a royal baby, so there's no excuse for not being prepared.

  5. If you get stuck in snow...

    Or ice, or mud. Get a high gear and come off the clutch verrrryyyy gently as you move off. If you keep revving your engine (the natural thing you'll want to do! - you'll just make your wheels spin and you'll get nowhere.

    If your car is actually snowed in and you can't get any traction, put one of your floor mats in front of each wheel to give it a grippy surface.


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Honor joined ingenie in 2014 and is in charge of words on the Young Driver's Guide and blog. Her first car is a Peugeot 206 cabriolet, which is a very sensible choice for the British climate. Follow her on .